Altimetric’s High Five – Wiki(d) research! (April 2018)

By 24.05.18

Welcome to the Altmetric High Five in association with the Science Council. On a monthly basis, the High Five posts examine a selection of the most popular research outputs Altmetric has seen attention for that month.

This month we’ll be focusing on the papers published in April that we’ve tracked the most attention for in Wikipedia.

The original post can be found on the Altmetric blog here. Links to all papers included can be found in the Reference section at the end.

1. How many butterflies?

Image credit: David Raju https://www.naturetrek.co.uk/tour.aspx?id=549

Our first paper is “Larval host plants of the butterflies of the Western Ghats, India” published in the Journal of Threatened Taxa lists the taxonomy of difference larval host plans.

This publication was referenced 36 times on 36 different Wikipedia pages.

2. Can you vet it?

Image credit: Biodiversity Heritage Library

The publication with the second most  Wikipedia attention is “A cabinet of the ordinary: domesticating veterinary education, 1766–1799”, published in The British Journal for the History of Science, looks at innovation of veterinary medicine in the 16th century.

This publication was referenced in by 14 pages, with 17 citations.

3. The objects in the mirror are closer than they appear

Image credit: Patrick L. Kelly et. al

The third paper “Extreme magnification of an individual star at redshift 1.5 by a galaxy-cluster lens”, was published in Nature Astronomy.

This publication is referenced 7 times on 7 different Wikipedia pages.

4. Does this look infected?

Image credit: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus

Our fourth publication is “Ortervirales: A new viral order unifying five families of reverse-transcribing viruses”, published in the Journal of Virology looks at the way viruses can mutate the RNA of various organisms.

6 Wikipedia pages have referenced this publication 6 times.

5. That’s not my name

Image credit Jorge A. Herrera-Flores et al

Our final paper Taxonomic reassessment of Clevosaurus latidens Fraser, 1993 (Lepidosauria, Rhynchocephalia) and rhynchocephalian phylogeny based on parsimony and Bayesian inference, published in the Journal of Paleontology reassess the place of a dinosaur in the existing taxonomy language.

This publication is referenced 5 times on 4 different Wikipedia pages.

References:

  1. Larval host plants of the butterflies of the Western Ghats, India
  2. A cabinet of the ordinary: domesticating veterinary education, 1766–1799
  3. Extreme magnification of an individual star at redshift 1.5 by a galaxy-cluster lens
  4. Ortervirales: A new viral order unifying five families of reverse-transcribing viruses
  5. Taxonomic reassessment of Clevosaurus latidens Fraser, 1993 (Lepidosauria, Rhynchocephalia) and rhynchocephalian phylogeny based on parsimony and Bayesian inference

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